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The Top 5 Blogs of 2021–2022

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The armored catfish pictured here is an invasive species in the San Antonio River Basin.

Last Updated on January 30, 2024

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Greetings San Antonio River Authority (River Authority) blog readers! Twice a week, we enjoy bringing you exciting information about the San Antonio River Watershed (also known as the San Antonio River Basin), the people and organisms that call it home, and the River Authority’s many ongoing projects and events. Did you miss our pick for the Top 5 blogs of the past year? Read below to learn more about our local, precious freshwater resources!

Don’t miss out! Subscribe to the blog and be the first to know about what’s happening at your San Antonio River!

 

#1 Don’t Dump Your Aquarium in the River

 

This popular blog was viewed over 1,700 times! Featuring two invasive species causing harm to the ecosystems of the San Antonio River Watershed, this blog shares what you can do to help prevent the spread of these species in our waterways.

#2 The San Antonio River Tunnel: Protecting Downtown San Antonio

The San Antonio River Tunnel

 

Did you know about the giant tunnel underneath downtown San Antonio? Read along to learn about the engineering marvel that is the San Antonio River Tunnel—how it works, where it is located, and how it has helped protect people and property from damaging floods for over twenty years.

#3 River Threats: Apple Snails

Cluster of Apple Snail eggs found along the San Antonio River.

 

What are apple snails, and why are they threatening the San Antonio River? In this blog, learn more about this invasive species and what the River Authority is doing to address its presence. Want to know what the snails are up to now? Read about the return of the apple snails.

#4 Flooding Flashback: The 100th Anniversary of the Big Flood of 1921

Damages from the September 9, 1921 flood in downtown San Antonio

 

The Big Flood of 1921 was a devastating natural disaster that occurred over 100 years ago in San Antonio. This blog discusses how the historical flood led to the creation of the River Authority and the advanced tools available to help you prepare and protect yourself and your property from flooding.

#5 Why did the River Authority remove trees from the Mission Reach?

Mission Reach prescribed burn clearing

 

Get the inside scoop on the historical context for projects like stem density removal on the Mission Reach of the San Antonio River Walk and learn how the River Authority balances the competing project priorities of flood protection, ecosystem restoration, and recreation along the San Antonio River.


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River Reach is a quarterly, 12-page newsletter that is designed to inform the San Antonio River Authority’s constituents about the agency’s many projects, serve as a communication vehicle for the board of directors and foster a sense of unity and identity among the residents of Bexar, Wilson, Karnes, and Goliad counties.

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Related Articles

Alerts

Stem Density Efforts

Stem Density efforts are still in place but will not directly affect any parks or trails. We apologize for any inconvenience.

San Pedro Creek Culture Park – STREAM

Due to maintenance, the water features for STREAM art piece will be turned off until further notice. The STREAM Microphone area is also closed due to vandalism. We apologize for the inconvenience.

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